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wills Archives

Being informative may prevent inheritance disputes in your family

When you start the process of organizing the plan for your future and how you will distribute your estate to your surviving family members, your first concern may not be telling your family the details of what you are doing. However, your willingness to be open about your intentions may have quite an impact on preventing disagreements between your family after your death. AT Curley Law Firm LLP, we are experienced in helping families in Massachusetts with estate planning. 

Does Massachusetts allow oral wills?

If you want to create a will, it is essential to make sure you follow the rules of your state. Massachusetts law has several requirements that you must follow to ensure your will is valid. In the vast majority of cases, you must write and sign your will and get witnesses to sign it as well. However, there are certain situations in which you may make a nuncupative (oral) will.

Ademption explained

There are a number of complexities that can be inherent with the estate planning process. One would think, however, that remembering exactly what properties and assets comprise one's estate in Wakefield might not be one of them. Yet people often draft their wills several years prior to their deaths. During the time between the writing of the will and a testator's passing, properties that were included as part of an estate can change hands, thus causing them to fall out of a will's purview. 

Execution of a Massachusetts will

Preparing for the future is an important part of the life of Massachusetts residents, no matter how old. People work hard to amass wealth and property throughout their lives, and want that property disbursed properly after they die. Because death is often unexpected, how can they always be prepared for the unpredictable?

Information you should not include in your will

If you are ready to begin your estate plan, you may be thinking about who to name as beneficiaries in your will, and how you can divide assets fairly. However, not everything goes in a will. At Curley Law Firm LLP, our legal team assists people in identifying which assets to include in the will, and which may need to be addressed through other methods.

Setting up a joint will

Estate planning brings up a number of considerations, such as deciding which beneficiaries will receive certain assets. Moreover, some people may have difficulty determining which type of estate plan is best and we have written about some of their options on our blog. In this post, we will look into joint wills and some of the reasons why this option can be advantageous. As with any kind of estate plan, it is crucial to carefully go over the ins and outs of a joint will before you move forward.

What is intestate succession in Massachusetts?

The underlying questions demonstrating the need for estate planning is "What happens if I die without a will?" You may think that if you leave nothing behind stating how you want your assets to be dispersed, your family and friends in Wakefield may be allowed to make such a decision themselves. Unfortunately, that is not the case. If you die without a will, then your estate is considered to be "intestate." The guidelines for dispersing such estates are left for the state to determine. 

Will revision and changes in the family

There are a number of reasons why you may need to go over your will again, such as the loss of someone you love or filing for a divorce. If you are considering bringing your marriage to an end, or if you have already completed the divorce process, it is crucial to make sure that you do not overlook any necessary revisions to your will. Outside of divorce, there are other significant changes that may occur in your life involving your loved ones, and it is important to be aware of how these changes could affect your will.

3 places to store a will

After someone dies, the person named as executor of the estate must find the will and have it probated in Massachusetts probate court. If the executor cannot find the will, it could delay the process and keep the beneficiaries from receiving their inheritances in a timely way.