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wills Archives

Setting up a joint will

Estate planning brings up a number of considerations, such as deciding which beneficiaries will receive certain assets. Moreover, some people may have difficulty determining which type of estate plan is best and we have written about some of their options on our blog. In this post, we will look into joint wills and some of the reasons why this option can be advantageous. As with any kind of estate plan, it is crucial to carefully go over the ins and outs of a joint will before you move forward.

What is intestate succession in Massachusetts?

The underlying questions demonstrating the need for estate planning is "What happens if I die without a will?" You may think that if you leave nothing behind stating how you want your assets to be dispersed, your family and friends in Wakefield may be allowed to make such a decision themselves. Unfortunately, that is not the case. If you die without a will, then your estate is considered to be "intestate." The guidelines for dispersing such estates are left for the state to determine. 

Will revision and changes in the family

There are a number of reasons why you may need to go over your will again, such as the loss of someone you love or filing for a divorce. If you are considering bringing your marriage to an end, or if you have already completed the divorce process, it is crucial to make sure that you do not overlook any necessary revisions to your will. Outside of divorce, there are other significant changes that may occur in your life involving your loved ones, and it is important to be aware of how these changes could affect your will.

3 places to store a will

After someone dies, the person named as executor of the estate must find the will and have it probated in Massachusetts probate court. If the executor cannot find the will, it could delay the process and keep the beneficiaries from receiving their inheritances in a timely way.

Do you need a pour-over will?

You set up a trust years ago, and you've been putting assets such as your home in Massachusetts into it, updating it as needed. After all, you are determined that your beneficiaries get all of your assets with as few tax consequences as possible. However, what if the unthinkable happens before you have a chance to make the most recent updates?

Changing the executor of your will

We have covered some of the different issues that arise with respect to wills, but it is important to keep in mind that certain events (such as a death or divorce) or a change of heart may necessitate key revisions to an estate plan. For example, you may need to change the executor of your will because the previous person you had assigned these responsibilities to is no longer capable of serving as the executor or you do not want them to have these responsibilities. There are a number of important points to keep in mind when it comes to naming an executor.

Changing the executor of your will

When it comes to wills, there are all sorts of different challenges that may arise and our law firm has covered many on this blog. However, there are far more questions and concerns that people may have with respect to their will, such as changing the executor. There may be a variety of reasons why you have decided to change the executor, from ending your marriage to becoming estranged from the person you have named the executor or losing confidence in their ability to carry out these responsibilities. Regardless, it is important to approach these issues with care.

Wills and naming beneficiaries

When it comes to estates, various questions may arise, from the early stages of planning until after one passes away. If you have decided that a will is the best way to protect your estate, it is essential to closely look over some of the different questions that you have or decisions that you could have to make. For example, you might have difficulty with naming beneficiaries. At Curley Law Firm, we know that it can be very hard to decide how to distribute your property among beneficiaries. However, it is pivotal for people in Middlesex and other Massachusetts cities to make sure that they work through this phase appropriately.